Statrys Payment Platform Ecosystem

How to Get a Proof of Address in Hong Kong

Statrys Team
Published: 24 Sep 2020

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    A proof of address in Hong Kong is a document which shows that your name is associated with a real Hong Kong address.

    This is meant to verify that you truly are a resident of Hong Kong. But what classifies as a proof of address? 

    What constitutes proof of address in Hong Kong?

    Think about what it means to truly live somewhere. Is it where you eat, sleep, and bathe? Not quite: we do that at hotels, but we don’t live in them.

    Is it where we have our family and loved ones? Perhaps, but from a logistical standpoint, that’s not good enough.

    Living somewhere, for the purposes of business and government, means you pay the bills. Literally, your name and address needs to be on a bill for the government and certain businesses to recognize that you live there.

    When you think about it, it makes perfect sense. When a government is trying to decide whether or not to offer someone a recognition of residency, one of the most important things they consider is the economic impact of doing so.

    Before giving acknowledgement to a resident, they must first be reasonably assured that the person is contributing to the economy. Paying bills from a given address, with certain assumptions, verifies that the person listed with the address is earning an income and spending that income in the community.

    It also verifies that the person can receive mail from that address, which is a key indication of true residency.

    Of course, the system isn’t perfect. Someone who isn’t actually living in Hong Kong can easily manufacture these documents.

    By the same token, someone who has lived in Hong Kong for years may not have their name on any of their bills (if they are a child or dependent spouse, for example.)

    Regardless of your particular situation, if you need proof of address in Hong Kong, the easiest way is to put your name on a bill. Let’s explore the best ways to do this.

    How can I get proof of address in Hong Kong?

    There are a few very common ways to get proof of address in Hong Kong. Bear in mind, you shouldn’t try to secure these unless you actually live, or plan to live, in Hong Kong. Address fraud is not only ethically unacceptable - it’s also highly illegal. That said, here are the easiest ways to get proof of address in Hong Kong:

    A Hong Kong Phone Bill

    Thanks to massive improvements in phone technology in recent decades, it’s now easier than ever to get a phone plan set up.

    It’s cheap, too. Here’s a Hong Kong mobile phone service that starts at just HK$50 per month!

    Visit your nearest mobile phone provider, buy the cheapest phone you can find, and get the most basic plan. Register the plan to your address of residency (a relative or friend’s place, or your own new apartment). Within a month, you should receive the bill or statement from the phone company, with your name and address on it.

    You can also sign up for electronic delivery, which may enable you to get a bill even faster. Of course, some government services and businesses still require a paper document, so keep that in mind when deciding on a strategy.

    A Utility Bill

    When you get a new house or apartment, you’ll start receiving utility bills in your name on a monthly basis. If you own or officially rent your place in Hong Kong, this should be your go-to for proof of address.

    If you’re not officially owning or renting yet, you can ask the friend or relative you’re staying with to transfer the bill to your name for one month. Once that bill comes in, you can use it as a proof of address and then transfer the bill back to your friend or relative.

    A Bank Statement

    If you transfer your current bank account to use your Hong Kong address, you should receive your next bill at your Hong Kong residence. That constitutes proof of address, and will work for almost every case.

    Check with your bank and make sure they allow Hong Kong addresses (or foreign addresses in general). Some banks are meant to be solely for domestic-based funds, which makes switching your address to another country can be tricky.

    University Documents

    A lot of international students go to school in Hong Kong. Students can use a university bill (tuition, board, books, etc.) as proof of address.

    Family Relation

    If you live with your family in Hong Kong, but your name isn’t on the bills, you can use a bill for a member of your family, in conjunction with a document that proves your family relation.

    This could be a birth certificate, marriage license, or will/estate document. As long as you can prove that you’re part of the family, you’ll be considered a resident.

    Back to You

    Moving to Hong Kong is one of the most exciting things a person can do. The nightlife, the food, and the pace of life are sure to be overwhelming in all the best ways. The paperwork can be a hassle, but by understanding what needs to be done, and what needs to be proven, you can make your transition smooth and stress-free.

    Statrys specializes in helping international businesses maximize their profits and efficiency with innovative, technologically oriented payment systems. From Hong Kong business accounts to forex services and hedging, Statrys has everything you need to supercharge your international business.

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    Statrys Limited is licensed as a Money Service Operator (No. 19-02-02726) in Hong Kong. ‍ Statrys UK Limited is a Small Payment Institution (FRM: 911226) registered with the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom. Statrys UK Limited (FRM: 902805) is a registered agent of PayrNet Limited (FRM:900594), an Electronic Money Institution authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom under the Electronic Money Regulations 2011 for the issuing of electronic money. Trade financing services are offered by our partner, Velotrade Management Limited, regulated by the Securities and Futures Commission of Hong Kong (CE Ref #BJL007)